Parent advice for teen dating

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These conversations need to happen if we are to educate our children about how to have healthy relationships.

Regardless of how old your child is, chat with them about things like; Some of these challenges can be resolved by being prepared ahead of time and discussing expectations together.

Notice what "dating" seems to mean to your child and then talk about it.

Michelle Anthony, Ph D, a developmental psychologist and learning therapist in Denver, suggests an opening line like: “It sounds like a lot of kids are talking about dating now. ” If you can't tell what dating means to your kid, try discussing dating as shown on TV shows or in movies that are age-appropriate.

For instance, Atkins suggests asking your child why they think someone acted the way they did, and whether they made a good or healthy choice. It's your job, as their parent, to figure out if your child is ready to handle the level of dating they have in mind.

Pay attention to how they respond when you start a conversation about dating.

Teens’ relationships today can be even more consuming than ours were – with the added accessibility of the other person making the relationship both more private and more public simultaneously, as well as more intimate – and potentially more intense.“Of course it will probably be uncomfortable for both of you,” Anthony says.“But if he’s so uncomfortable that he gets angry or shuts down or otherwise just can’t continue the conversation, that’s a big sign that he’s not ready for this.” If so, assure your child that there’s no hurry to start dating.Try to be open to discussing it, rather than lecturing them.You want them to listen to your opinion, yet at the same time feel they are making up their own mind.As parents, we all want our teens to have good early relationships, so we should discuss what constitutes a healthy relationship before they begin dating.

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