Easter dating

The dates for Orthodox Easter Sunday shown above are for the Gregorian calendar equivalent, i.e. The Julian calendar date Thursday October 4, 1582 was followed by the Gregorian calendar date Friday October 15, 1582. In some years the Orthodox Easter Sunday occurs on the same day as the Western Easter Sunday.

ith his comforting words to Mary, the angel Gabriel explains the miracle not only of Jesus’s conception but also of his resurrection, which we celebrate tomorrow.

Many thanks must go to Ron Mallen for his tireless, meticulous and scientific process in researching this history.

It started as a year of 10 lunar months, and soon changed to a lunar year of 12 months.It had once been in the possession of the Knights Templar, according to a researcher at the Vatican Secret Archives.Since the 17th century, the sacred cloth has been housed in the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, Italy, except for a few years in the middle of the last century.Different Christian denominations continue to celebrate Easter on different dates, with Eastern and Western Christian churches being a notable example. The dioceses of all Asia, according to an ancient tradition, held that the fourteenth day of the moon [of Nisan], on which day the Jews were commanded to sacrifice the lamb, should always be observed as the feast of the life-giving pasch (epi tes tou soteriou Pascha heortes ἐπὶ ταῖς τοῦ σωτηρίου Πάσχα ἑορταῖς), contending that the fast ought to end on that day, whatever day of the week it might happen to be.Some see this first phase as mainly concerned with whether Christians should follow Old Testament practices, see also Christian views on the Old Covenant and Judaizers. However it was not the custom of the churches in the rest of the world to end it at this point, as they observed the practice, which from Apostolic tradition has prevailed to the present time, of terminating the fast on no other day than on that of the Resurrection of our Saviour." Quartodecimanism, a word not used in Eusebius' account as he wrote in Greek, is derived from the Biblical Latin term for the practice of fixing the celebration of Passover for Christians on the fourteenth (Latin quarta decima) day of Nisan in the Old Testament's Hebrew Calendar (for example Lev 23:5).This history starts on the "Kalends of March" or March 1st with the introduction of the Roman calendar in the year 1 AUC (AUC stands for Ab Urbe Condita, meaning "from the foundation of Rome").

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