Percentage of marriages through online dating dating marriage elizabethan times

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Some 22% of 25-34 year olds and 17% of 35-44 year olds are online daters.

Online dating is also relatively popular among the college-educated, as well as among urban and suburban residents.

The difference remained statistically significant even after controlling for variables like year of marriage, sex, age, education, ethnicity, household income, religion and employment status.

Among couples who were still married during the survey, those who met online reported higher marital satisfaction -- an average score of 5.64 on a satisfaction survey -- than those who met offline and averaged 5.48.

One in every ten American adults has used an online dating site or a mobile dating app.

We refer to these individuals throughout this report as “online daters,” and we define them in the following way: Taken together, 11% of all American adults have done one or both of these activities and are classified as “online daters.” In terms of demographics, online dating is most common among Americans in their mid-20’s through mid-40’s.

The lowest satisfaction rates were reported by people who met through family, work, bars/clubs or blind dates.

“Even though a large percentage of marriages in recent years have resulted from couples meeting online, looking for partners online may potentially suppress the desire for getting married,” said report author Dr Aditi Paul.

More than a third of recent marriages in the USA started online, according to a study out Monday that presents more evidence of just how much technology has taken hold of our lives."Societally, we are going to increasingly meet more of our romantic partners online as we establish more of an online presence in terms of social media," says Caitlin Moldvay, a dating industry senior analyst for market research firm IBISWorld in Santa Monica, Calif.

marriages begin with online dating, and those couples may be slightly happier than couples who meet through other means, a U. The research is based on a nationally representative survey of 19,131 people who married between 20.

Online dating has ballooned into a billion-dollar industry and the Internet "may be altering the dynamics and outcome of marriage itself," said the study by U. researchers in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

About 45% of couples met on dating sites; the rest met on online social networks, chat rooms, instant messaging or other online forums.

Lead author John Cacioppo, a psychologist and director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago, says dating sites may "attract people who are serious about getting married."While Cacioppo is a noted researcher and the study is in a prestigious scientific journal, it is not without controversy.

It was commissioned by the dating website e Harmony, according to the study's conflict of interest statement.

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