Dating the turin shroud scott baio dating history

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The Pope provided the introduction for a TV appearance of the cloth on Holy Saturday.

New research claims that the cloth does in fact date from the era of Christ, disputing other tests dating it to the Middle Ages.

Last year scientists at the University of Padua in northern Italy dated it to between 300BC and AD400 – still hundreds of years after Christ, who is believed to have died between 30-36AD.

The plant DNA came from all over the world, the researchers reported Oct. European spruce trees; Mediterranean clovers, ryegrasses and plantains; North American black locust trees; and rare East Asian pear and plum trees all left their mark on the cloth.The Shroud of Turin is much older than suggested by radiocarbon dating carried out in the 1980s, according to a new study in a peer-reviewed journal.A research paper published in Thermochimica Acta suggests the shroud is between 1,300 and 3,000 years old."We cannot say anything more on its origin." The new findings don't rule out either the notion that the long strip of linen is a medieval forgery or that it's the true burial shroud of Jesus Christ, the researchers said. 1390, lending credence to the notion that it was an elaborate fake created in the Middle Ages.Long-standing debate On its face, the Shroud of Turin is an unassuming piece of twill cloth that bears traces of blood and a darkened imprint of a man's body. However, the Catholic Church only officially recorded its existence in A. 1353, when it showed up in a tiny church in Lirey, France. (Isotopes are forms of an element with a different number of neutrons.) But critics argued that the researchers used patched-up portions of the cloth to date the samples, which could have been much younger than the rest of the garment.But Cesare Nosiglia, the Archbishop of Turin and "pontifical custodian of the shroud," said the special display on Holy Saturday "means that it represents a very important testimony to the Passion and the resurrection of the Lord," The Telegraph reported.

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